Why Chocolate is Bad for Dogs

Sat, Mar 2, 2013

Pet Care, Pet Foods

Dog owners, at one point in time, have stumbled upon an age-old “rule” that reminds them never to give their dogs chocolate.

From pit bulls to German Shepherds, the saying has been associated with all sorts of health risks which dogs are liable to encounter, but just exactly why they are bad for dogs isn’t always talked about in detail.
Chocolate is Bad for Dogs
Generally, an alkaloid known as theobromine is attributed to be the reason why chocolate is bad for dogs. Found in chocolate, theobromine is known to be a type of stimulant, one which belongs to the caffeine family.

In a nutshell, theobromine is linked with stimulating the cardiovascular system and the central nervous system, just as it is also known to cause an increase in blood pressure.

While its consumption in humans isn’t known to lead to adverse side effects, animals are not as robustly equipped to deal with theobromine once introduced into their systems. Animals such as cats, horses and dogs are among the popular examples of creatures incapable of metabolizing theobromine at ideal rates.

This means that, in essence, animals can still consume theobromine, but their bodies cannot quickly metabolize it just as the human body can.

While this actually means that pit bull owners can actually give their dogs chocolate, consideration on the quantity has to be noted, since too much of it could prove to be disastrous.

Given its metabolic ties as a risk for dogs, computations regarding the ideal safe chocolate quantity is highly debated, with most resolutions simply left in reminding dog owners that it is best to just not give chocolate to dogs.

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- who has written 584 posts on Pit Bull Mixed – The world of Purebred and Hybrid Dogs.


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